The Review — 22/09/2014 at 16:05

These Five Companies are great places for working moms

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In the Netherlands, new mothers get 16 weeks of paid leave and can take unpaid parental leave for as long as 26 weeks. They don’t have it as good as the moms and dads in Sweden, where companies provide 16 months of family leave, 60 days of which are reserved for fathers.

Still, the Netherlands’ four months is enviable to most working American women, who are legally entitled to only 12 weeks off—without pay.

That’s all the U.S. government mandates, but some businesses do more to look after the financial well-being of their childbearing employees, including those in the U.S. Among the 2014 list of 100 companies that treat working moms right released byWorkingmother.com, five offer at least 15 weeks, or more than three months, of paid maternity leave. They’re like the Netherlands of employers. Yet women are a minority of the workforce at all but one of these companies. Ladies, why are you working anywhere else? Shouldn’t these places be, like, 75 percent female?

These employers may be particularly attractive because the share of U.S. companies that offer fully paid maternity leave fell from 9 percent in 2012 to 5 percent in 2014, according to data (PDF) from the Society for Human Resource Management.

“A majority of moms work,” says Jennifer Owens, editorial director for Working Mother Media. “You really should be looking beyond your salary and health benefits.” Herewith, five corporate utopias for new mothers, as measured by paid leave.

Deutsche Bank (DB)

Fully paid weeks off for new moms (average): 18
Percent of employees who are women: 36 percent

Arnold & Porter

Fully paid weeks off for new moms (average): 18
Percent of employees who are women: 53 percent

Goldman Sachs Group  (GS)

Fully paid weeks off for new moms (average): 16
Percent of employees who are women: 36 percent

Barclays (BCS)

Fully paid weeks off for new moms (average): 16
Percent of employees who are women: 34 percent

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Fully paid weeks off for new moms (average): 15
Percent of employees who are women: 45 percent

Source: Workingmother.com

Businessweek.com

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